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  • Home >> Google >> What is Buckyball, Buckyball wikipedia, Buckyball uses, Buckyball structure – Buckyball Google Doodle: 25th anniversary and history of fullerene

    What is Buckyball, Buckyball wikipedia, Buckyball uses, Buckyball structure – Buckyball Google Doodle: 25th anniversary and history of fullerene


    If you have visited Google Search Engine today (4th September, 2010), You must have seen an interactive Google Doodle Logo. Today, they are showing a circle like structure. The interesting thing of today’s Google Doddle is that it is Interactive.

    Todays Google Doodle is Buckyball. Google is celebrating the 25th anniversary of Bucky Ball. You can see the Buckyball doodle via google.co.in or google.com.

    Google Doodle BuckyBall

    Now the question that comes to our mind is What is BuckyBall ?

    What is BuckyBall ?

    Just look at the history of Buckyball by looking it into “fullerene”.

    A fullerene is any molecule composed entirely of carbon, in the form of a hollow sphere, ellipsoid, or tube. Spherical fullerenes are also called Buckyballs, and cylindrical ones are called carbon nanotubes or buckytubes. Fullerenes are similar in structure to graphite, which is composed of stacked graphene sheets of linked hexagonal rings; but they may also contain pentagonal rings. Wikipedia has a nice article all about fullerene (aka Buckminsterfullerine molecule) and the Buckyball here.

    The discovery was named after Richard Buckminster Fuller, which had been discovered in Rice University, Texas. The group of scientists involved included Richard Smalley, Robert Curl, Sean O’Brien, James Heath, and Harold Kroto.

    What is Buckyball, Buckyball wikipedia, Buckyball structure - Buckyball Google Doodle  25th anniversary and history of fullerene

    Fullerene Buckyball 25th Anniversary Commemorated in Google Doodle as Google has replaced the logo on their Home page with an interactive Buckminsterfullerene doodle to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the buckyball discovery. The Google has turned its one of the alphabet ‘O’ into a buckyball logo. First of all let us see What is Buckyball? , Buckyball Uses and Buckyball Structure Definition here below or you can visit wikipedia for What is Buckyball, Buckyball Uses and Buckyball Structure Definition in Buckyball wiki as Spherical fullerenes are also called buckyballs. You can also check here a detailed information about this fullerene buckyball or google buckyball, Buckyball Structure, Nanotubes and Buckyball Definition. You can rotate that buckyball using your mouse in any direction. Buckyball doodle is visible on the home page of Google.com and Google.co.in.

    Google’s Spinning Buckyball Logo

    If you visit Google on Saturday, September 4th, or visit a Google property where it is already September 4th such as Google New Zealand, you will see a special Google logo. The logo is of a buckyball or fullerence, which is any molecule composed entirely of carbon, in the form of a hollow sphere, ellipsoid, or tube.

    Bucky Ball Video

    Spherical fullerenes are also called buckyballs, and cylindrical ones are called carbon nanotubes or buckytubes. Fullerenes are similar in structure to graphite, which is composed of stacked graphene sheets of linked hexagonal rings; but they may also contain pentagonal (or sometimes heptagonal) rings.

    Buckyball Uses

    There are many uses of Buckyball. It is used in Drug Treatments, Gadolinium Carriers, Nano STM, Lubricants, Superconductors, Catalysts, and more.

    Buckyball structure

    The structure of buckminsterfullerene is a truncated (T = 3) icosahedron which resembles a soccer ball of the type made of twenty hexagons and twelve pentagons, with a carbon atom at the vertices of each polygon and a bond along each polygon edge.

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    2 Comments

    1. rohit says:

      if you explain more then studets understand eaisly

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